Category Archives: Uncategorized

#9: America’s Chernobyl (2 of 2)



Hanford is the most-polluted place in America. On our last episode, you heard about the nuclear plant’s largely-forgotten history–how it poisoned the people living downwind. On our season finale: a nuclear safety auditor tries to get it shut down, the downwinders struggle for justice, and we take you into the plant itself. The story of Hanford reveals that expertise is always a political battle, and never as straightforward as simply collecting facts–whether it’s executives putting profit over a safety auditor’s well-documented warnings, a community-based research pitted against government-backed studies, or turning a world-changing nuclear reactor into a dull scientific lecture.

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You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Nicole Yakashiro, including: a detailed Hanford timeline, as well as the colonial history of the Hanford site. Plus, a transcript.

———-PROGRAMMING NOTE———-

Sadly, this is the last episode of our season! We’ll be back in Spring 2021, but we’ll be launching a new show in the meantime. You’ll find the first few episodes in this feed, so stay subscribed. The best way to stay abreast of our plans for our new season is to follow us on Twitter and Facebook. You’ll hear about it there first. Plus, while you’re waiting, you might want to check out some of the other stuff that our team makes. Like Crackdowna podcast about the drug war, covered by drug users as war correspondents.

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How did you like the season? Which was your favourite episode, which was your least favourite episode? What should we do next? Let us know! Email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show.

———-CREDITS———

This episode was produced Gordon Katic and Polly Leger. With editing support from Acey Rowe. Nicole Yakashiro was our research assistant, and Aurora Tejeida was our fact-checker.

Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

We’d like to thank historian Sarah Fox author of “Downwind: A People’s History of the Nuclear West,” as well as Kate Brown, author of “Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters.” Check those out, and also check out Michael D’Antonio’s “Atomic Harvest: Hanford and the Lethal Toll of America’s Nuclear Arsenal.” These books were indispensable to us, and we highly recommend them.

If you want to learn more about the Downwinder lawsuits against Hanford, we recommend: The Hanford Plaintiffs: Voices from the Fight For Atomic Justice. That’s from Trisha T. Pritikin, with a forward from Karen Dorn Steele

Thanks to the many others we talked to along the way– including historians Linda M. Richards and Robert Franklin. As well as, Trisha Pritikin, Tom Carpenter, John Fox, and Maynard Plahuta. Thanks also to Karen Richards who helped record our interview with Patricia Hoover.

This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council. It’s part of a larger project on the politics of historical commemoration. Professor Eagle Glassheim at the University of British Columbia is the academic lead on that project.

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.


#8: America’s Chernobyl (1 of 2)



Richland, Washington is a company town that sprang up almost overnight in the desert of South Eastern Washington. Its employer is the federal government, and its product is plutonium. The Hanford nuclear site was one of the Manhattan Project sites, and it made the plutonium for the bomb that devastated Nagasaki. Here, the official history is one of scientific achievement, comfortable houses, and good-paying jobs. But it doesn’t include the story of what happened after the bomb was dropped — neither in Japan, nor right there in Washington State. On part one of our two-part season finale, we tell the largely-forgotten story of the most toxic place in America.

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You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Nicole Yakashiro, including: a detailed Hanford timeline, as well as the colonial history of the Hanford site. Plus, a transcript.

———-PROGRAMMING NOTE———-

Yes, Cited has an album. Our brilliant composer Mike Barber put it together, and you can find it on his website and on Bandcamp. Check it out.

Plus, we have branded mugs. And we’re doing a very simple giveaway. Write a review of Cited on Stitcher or Apple Podcasts, and then email me us a photo to info@citedmedia.ca. We’ll randomly pick three of the people who email, and send you a free mug.

———-FOLLOW CITED———

To keep up with Cited, Secondary Symptoms, and our upcoming show: follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Tweet at us, or email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show.

———-CREDITS———-

This episode was produced Gordon Katic and Polly Leger. With editing support from Acey Rowe. Nicole Yakashiro was our research assistant, and Aurora Tejeida was our fact-checker.

Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

We’d like to thank historians Sarah Fox, author of “Downwind: A People’s History of the Nuclear West,” as well as Kate Brown, author of “Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters.” Check those out, and also check out Michael D’Antonio’sAtomic Harvest: Hanford and the Lethal Toll of America’s Nuclear Arsenal.” These books were indispensable to us. You can find links to those and others things at citedpodcast.com. But don’t read anything until you hear next week’s episode, because you might read some spoilers.

Thanks to the many others we talked to along the way– including historians Linda M. Richards and Robert Franklin. As well as, Pat Hoover, Trisha Pritikin, Tom Carpenter, John Fox, and Maynard Plahuta.

This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council. It’s part of a larger project on the politics of historical commemoration. Professor Eagle Glassheim at the University of British Columbia is the academic lead on that project.

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.


Secondary Symptoms #8: “Return to Normalcy”



The phrase “return to normalcy” has been thrown around a lot lately. It’s actually a phrase that was popularized in 1920, in the wake of the WW1 and the Spanish Flu. But, as with the Spanish Flu, “returning to normalcy” means forgetting the conditions that brought us COVID-19, and perhaps even forgetting COVID-19 itself. On this last episode of Secondary Symptoms, we focus on the politics of pandemic memory. We’re still in the thick of it, but many already seem like they want us to forget; yet, we will never forget.

Gordon Katic talks to Andrew Stoeten (11:00), baseball writer at the Athletic and co-host of the Birds all Day podcast, about baseball’s dubious return plans. MLB’s commissioner claims the game will help us “return to normalcy,” but — with piped-in crowd noise and cardboard cut-out fans — there is nothing normal about these games. Next, historian Nancy Bristow (23:07) talks about her book, American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influence Epidemic. She explains why officials wanted the public to forget the epidemic, even while it was still happening. However, Nancy also argues that regular people simply couldn’t forget. In that spirit, we ask a number of folks one simple question: what will you remember about COVID-19? Finally, even though there are no memorials to the Spanish Flu, it is memorialized in one place: the blues. To close out the show, Mike Rugel (56:33) from the podcast Uncensored History of the Blues, plays us a few classic songs of pandemics and disease.

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UPDATE: Since speaking with Andrew Stoeten, MLB’s Miami Marlins have suffered a coronavirus outbreak. A number of games have been postponed, and many are wondering if the season may already be in jeopardy—less than one week after beginning.

To read more about Harding’s “return to normalcy,” check out the article by historian William Deverell in the Smithsonian Magazine.  

Also, check out our Spotify Playlist to hear the songs in full. They were: Jesus is Coming Soon, by Blind Willie Johnson; Memphis Flu, by Elder Curry; the 1919 Influenza Blues, by Essie Jenkins; Dyin’ Flu, by Albert Collins; and Don’t Let the Corona Get on Ya, by Deacon Otis Wicknine.

———-PROGRAMING NOTE———-

This is the last episode of Secondary Symptoms. Don’t fear, though; we’ll be bringing it back as a new, standalone show. The new show will be here in a month or two, and you’ll see the first few episodes in this feed.  

To keep up with Cited, Secondary Symptoms, and our upcoming show: follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Tweet at us, or email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show.

———-CREDITS———-

This episode was produced by Jay Cockburn and Gordon Katic.

Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. This is part of wider project looking at trends in the politics of historical commemoration. Professor Eagle Glassheim at the University of British Columbia is the academic lead on that project.

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.


The Heroin Clinic (Rebroadcast)



At Crosstown Clinic, doctors are turning addiction treatment on its head: they’re prescribing heroin-users the very drug they’re addicted to. This is the story of one clinic’s quest to remove the harms of addiction, without removing the addiction itself.

———-PROGRAMMING NOTE———-

This is one of the best episodes in our archive. It was broadcast March 9th, 2017, and was honoured with a 2017 Jack Webster Foundation award for excellence in feature reporting in radio. The Jack Webster Awards are BC’s most prestigious journalism awards.

Our next original documentary will be out next week.

The Heroin Clinic was made in partnership with the Vancouver newspaper The Georgia Straight and the podcast Life of the Law. Check out the companion piece we produced with Travis here.

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If you want to hear more stories about the drug war, check out our other podcast Crackdown. Recently, Crackdown produced an episode commemorating longtime Vancouver drug user activist, Dave Murrary. Dave is pretty much the only reason this heroin clinic ever took off, and his story is chronicled in more detail on Crackdown.

———-FOLLOW CITED———-

To keep up with Cited, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Tweet at us, or email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show. 

———-CREDITS———-

This radio documentary was produced by Gordon Katic, Sam Fenn, Alex Kim, and Travis Lupick. With editing from Nancy Mulane.

We’d like to thank Life of the Law for their editorial support, Dan Reist for academic mentorship, Josh GD for editorial input, as well as Lauryn Rohde and Jenn Luu for research and marketing help.

Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.


Secondary Symptoms #7: Medical Imaginaries



Our whirlwind tour of the pharmaceutical industry ends this week. We’ve shown you the dysfunction, now we look for a better way. For some reason, the political vision is so curtailed here. Where is the manifesto for a new system? Even on the Bernie wing of the left, much of the focus is on negotiating better prices and importing pharmaceuticals from other countries. Today, we look at ways we can fundamentally change the industry, and medicine itself. 

On this episode of Secondary Symptoms, Gordon Katic interviews economist Dean Baker on his simple idea for how to overhaul the dysfunctional pharmaceutical industry: change the patent system. Then, Jayasree K. Iyer of the Access to Medicine Foundation reminds us that other viral infections — HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria — will surge because of COVID-related disruptions. Finally, we end with Cambridge philosopher Jacob Stegenga. His polemical book Medical Nihilism speaks to the limits of medicine. Perhaps the simple but more overlooked interventions — access to good food, clean air, healthy neighbourhoods —  may offer more than the elusive ‘magic bullets’ of medicine.  

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This episode is meant to accompany a wider series that we are doing this season about COVID-19 and the pharmaceutical industry. If you are interested in this episode of Secondary Symptoms, you would certainly be interested in a recent Cited documentary: the Tamiflu Trials. You can find it in this feed. 

You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Franklynn Bartol, on topics like: industry funding of patient advocacy groups, the meaning (and limitations) of ‘evidence-based medicine,’ and the broader research literature on industry funding and why it’s a problem

———-FOLLOW CITED———-

To keep up with Cited, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Tweet at us, or email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show. 

———-CREDITS———-

This episode was produced by Jay Cockburn and Gordon Katic. Franklynn Bartol was our research assistant.

Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. This is part of wider project looking at trends in pharmaceutical research and policy. Dr. Joel Lexchin at the University of Toronto and Professor Sergio Sismondo at Queens University in Kingston are the research advisors on that project.

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.


#7: The Poison Paradigm



On a daily basis, we are exposed to thousands of toxic chemicals. This is no accident; it is by design. They are everywhere – coating our consumer products, in our food packaging, being dumped into our lakes and sewers, and in countless other places. However, for the most part, regulators say that we need not worry.

That assessment is based on a simple 500-year-old adage, “the dose makes the poison.” The logic is simple: anything is poisonous, depending on how large a dose.  Dosing yourself with a minuscule amount of lead will cause no harm; while drinking an enormous amount of water will kill you. Regulators then try to find safe exposure levels for these chemicals—and they assume a simple, direct relationship (less is fine, more is worse). So, no matter how toxic the chemical, you only need to worry if it passes a certain exposure threshold.

However, what if their approach is all wrong? A revolutionary group of scientists are challenging this 500-year-old paradigm. They argue that some chemicals behave in erratic and unpredictable ways, and they can mess with us even at minuscule doses. If they’re right, then the chemicals around us are causing irreparable harm, and everything must change. We sort out this battle of paradigms through the lens of one of their most-hated chemicals, BPA.

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You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Franklynn Bartol, including: a detailed overview of the two paradigms, the low-down on CLARITY-BPA, and a description of how policies are changing in the EU. Plus, a transcript.

———-FOLLOW CITED———-

To keep up with Cited, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Plus, send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca.

———-CREDITS———-

This episode was produced by Irina Zhorov. Editing from Acey Rowe and Gordon Katic. Franklynn Bartol was our research assistant, with fact checking from Polly Leger.

Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

Special thanks to the scientists who helped us understand this story, including: Laura Vandenberg, Daniel Dietrich, Rich Giovane and Savannah Johnson.

This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council. It’s part of a larger project that examines the roles of values in science, lead by Professor Gunilla Oberg at the University of British Columbia. Professor Oberg also provided research guidance to the project, though this episode does not necessarily reflect the view of Professor Oberg or her project

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.


Secondary Symptoms #6: Pandemic Fat Cats



There’s another coronavirus. This one, causing horrific swelling in cats, even killing them. Gilead Pharmacueticals might have a drug that can cure this feline coronavirus.  Yet, they’re not sharing that drug, possibly because they’re scared it might harm their chances with another drug: Remdesivir. You may have heard of it; it’s the supposed ‘gold standard’ of care for COVID-19. The story of Remdesivir (and of the black market cat drug sibling) reveals how pharmaceutical companies do their research, and the lengths they go to protect their profits.

On this episode of Secondary Symptoms, Gordon interviews Atlantic writer Sarah Zhang about her article on the strange story of feline coronavirus and its possible black market cure, GS-441524. Then, investigative journalist Sharon Lerner of the Intercept tells us about her reporting on GS-441524’s sibling, Remdesivir–no black market necessary. Also on the program, Shannon Brownlee of the Lown Institute, on how to make sense of drug research during the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, Professor Sergio Sismondo talks about his book Ghost-Managed Medicine, which pulls back the curtain on medical ghostwriting and the other invisible ways that the industry shapes pharmaceutical knowledge.

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This episode is meant to accompany a wider series that we are doing this season about COVID-19 and the pharmaceutical industry. If you are interested in this episode of Secondary Symptoms, you would certainly be interested in a recent Cited documentary: the Tamiflu Trials. You can find it in this feed. 

You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Franklynn Bartol, on topics like: industry funding of patient advocacy groups, the meaning (and limitations) of ‘evidence-based medicine,’ and the broader research literature on industry funding and why it’s a problem

———-FOLLOW CITED———-

To keep up with Cited, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Tweet at us, or email your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show.

———-CREDITS———-

This episode was produced by Jay Cockburn and Gordon Katic. Franklynn Bartol was our research assistant.

Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. This is part of wider project looking at trends in pharmaceutical research and policy. Dr. Joel Lexchin at the University of Toronto and Professor Sergio Sismondo at Queens University in Kingston are the research advisors on that project.

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.


#6: The Tamiflu Trials



Medical experts are rushing to see which drugs might help treat COVID-19. There are dozens of candidates: Remdesivir, Hydroxycloroquin, Actemra, Kevzara, Favipiravir, the list goes on. They better pick the right one; because billions of dollars of public money is at stake, not to mention 100s of thousands — if not millions — of lives. 

We don’t know what will happen with COVID-19 drug research. But the story of past pandemics might give us a clue. To prepare for Swine Flu and Bird Flu, governments spent billions stockpiling a drug called Tamiflu. You’d think governments used the best evidence-based advice, but the story of Tamiflu raises questions about how money shaped the process.  

On this episode, we open up the black box of pharmaceutical and public health expertise. We tell the story of a drug, from its days as middling flu treatment through its meteoric rise to international blockbuster.  How do experts decide what makes a good drug, and how do pharmaceutical companies make billions from pandemic panic?

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This episode has loads more information, citations, and resources. You can also find related articles on our website, citedpodcast.com. Including articles by our research assistant, Franklynn Bartol, on topics like: industry funding of patient advocacy groups, the meaning (and limitations) of ‘evidence-based medicine,’ and the broader research literature on industry funding and why it’s a problem

———-CORRECTION———-

An earlier version of this podcast said that drug companies now must publish all their trial data before a drug goes to market. In fact, the FDA requires that the companies must register their trial data on a government website, ClinicalTrials.gov. This excludes non-randomized observational trials and a few other earlier, prospective studies. The script was changed to reflect that correction.

———-FOLLOW CITED———-

To keep up with Cited, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Plus, send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show. We’re also doing a mug giveaway this episode. If you’d like one (for free), please do us a favour: tell one of your friends about Cited. Email or text them and send me a screengrab. We’ll randomly pick three of the people who email me, and you’ll get a free Cited mug.

———-CREDITS———-

This episode was produced by Audrey Quinn and Gordon Katic. Editing from Acey Rowe and Gordon Katic. Franklynn Bartol was our research assistant, with fact checking from Aurora Tejeida and Polly Leger. Dr. Joel Lexchin and Professor Sergio Sismondo provided research guidance.

Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

Thanks to Hannah Arbour for Japanese translation, and Shungo Kano for voicing.

This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. This is part of wider project looking at trends in pharmaceutical research and policy. Dr. Joel Lexchin at the University of Toronto and Professor Sergio Sismondo at Queens University in Kingston are the research advisors on that project.

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.


What are Canadian Police (Still) Trying to Hide? (Rebroadcast with Update)



In the wake of George Flloyd’s murder in Minneappolis, millions of protesters around the world have marched against racism and police violence.

In Canada, we know that Indigenous and Black bodies are incarcerated at far higher rates than their white counterparts, despite making up a minority of the country’s population. But when it comes to actual police interactions — from who gets street checked to who the police use force against — the data is scarce.

When researchers and activists ask for those numbers, Canadian police forces refuse. We made an episode about this in June, 2017. 

Author and anti-racist activist Desmond Cole weighs in. Scot Wortley, one of Canada’s leading researchers of racial discrimination in the criminal justice system, talks about how not having systematic records on anything —from police checks, to charges, to bail outcomes—has dramatically hampered criminal justice research. However, Ron Melchers, a University of Ottawa criminologist says we shouldn’t keep this data— and he calls racial profiling a media myth. Things get heated.

———-UPDATES———-

Since this episode first aired, there have been some changes. 

First of all, guest Desmond Cole published his book “The Skin We’re In: A Year of Black Resistance and Power

This fall, Ontario’s Special Investigations Unit — the body that investigates police interactions involving serious injury, death or sexual assault — will start gathering race-based data, including Indigenous identity as well as ethnicity and religion. Ontario’s  Office of the Independent Police Review Director — which looks at complaints against the police from the public– announced this April that it was going to collect similar data. And the Toronto Police Department has said it will now collect and publicly release this data as well. This comes after a 2018 interim report from the Ontario Human Rights Commission, which hired criminologist Scot Wortley to look at racial bias in policing in Toronto. His work found that Black Torontonians are 20 times more likely to be killed by Toronto police than their white neighbours. Scot’s full report is set to be released this fall.

Scot was also hired by the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission to look at race-based street-checks in Halifax. He found Black residents were 6 times more likely to be stopped by the Halifax Regional Police than white residents. The Province has since banned the practise of street checks, or carding, but residents say the process continues.

This pattern continues across the country. In the three years since our episode first aired, independent reviews of police practises consistently showed that Black and Indigenous Canadians are over-represented in police interactions, including street checks and use of force.

In Vancouver — the VPD stopped Indigenous people for street checks 7 times more than the rest of the population, and black people about five times more. Edmonton, same story.

But most cities still don’t collect his data, despite rising calls to do so — from policing, access to housing, and medical care — as Covid-19 appears to be hitting Black and Indigenous communities at an overwhelming rate.

In this episode, we reconnect with Scot Wortley for an update, before revisiting our original broadcast, “What are Canadian Police Trying to Hide?”

———-CREDITS———-

This episode was produced by Gordon Katic.

This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.


Secondary Symptoms #5: I Can’t Breathe



The brutal public lynching of George Floyd has sparked a rebellion against police violence and systematic racism. The mostly peaceful protests are courageously rising up, while the police respond with unrelenting force. This all-out war against the American people tells us much about the government’s priorities; while nurses struggle to get basic protective equipment to fight the Covid-19 pandemic, over-funded police forces patrol American streets in expensive military gear. 

“I can’t breathe” is really the perfect chant for this moment. African Americans can’t breathe because the police put knees on their neck, but African Americans also can’t breathe because they die disproportionately from Covid-19. That’s the direct result of environmental racism; that’s toxic dumping and pollution, food deserts, and disinvestment in African American communities.  This week, we connect police brutality, environmental racism, and Covid-19. And we ask: what does this mean for the environmental movement? 

First, we call Robert Bullard, the father of environmental justice, and have him connect the dots for us. Then, Emily Atkin, climate journalist and writer/podcaster at Heated, calls out the mainstream environmental movement for its history of anti-black racism. Finally, Bill McKibben, perhaps the most influential environmentalist on the planet, tells us what Covid-19 means for the future of the planet. 

———-FOLLOW CITED———-

For more, follow Cited on Twitter, Facebook, and citedpodcast.com. Plus, send us your feedback to info@citedmedia.ca–we might just read it on the show.

———-CREDITS———-

This episode was produced by Jay Cockburn and Gordon Katic.

Our theme song and original music is by our composer, Mike Barber. Dakota Koop is our graphic designer. Our production manager is David Tobiasz, and executive producers are Gordon Katic and Sam Fenn.

This episode was funded in part by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. This is part of wider project challenging ideas in liberal environmental thought. The project was advised by Jessica Dempsey at the University of British Columbia, and Rosemary Collard from Simon Fraser University.

Cited is produced out of the Centre of Ethics at the University of Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. Cited is also produced out of the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia — that’s on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.